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‘All I did was look.’ Mont-roig, the Landscape of Joan Miró

Joan Miró’s Mont-roig embodies his roots and his ties to the land and to the simplicity of everyday things. Mont-roig is a symbol and a reality, both personal and universal, and the point of departure for everything.

On the occasion of the opening of Mas Miró, the farmhouse where the artist spent many summers, historian and Fundació Mas Miró Director Elena Juncosa follows in the footsteps of the artist’s sensibility to place us in the unalterable timelessness of one of Miró’s most important emotional landscapes.

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‘Che bella voce.’ Architecture, Voice and Speech

To speak of architecture is to speak of spaces and volumes, of building components and of light. But how can you draw light? Those are the questions that Cristina Masanés raises in this article which – without intending to unveil the metaphor – tells us about an intimate and poetic walk through the geometries of the Fundació Joan Miró and other buildings designed by the architect Josep Lluís Sert.

Cristina Masanés, who studied philosophy, has written for a variety of media and art centres. She works as a freelance journalist, documentalist and exhibition curator.

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24_01_2018

Miró as a Sounding Board

Coinciding with the recent publication of Joan Punyet Miró’s book Miró & Music (Ed. Alrevés, 2017), poet and cultural agitator Eduard Escoffet explores the close connection that Joan Miró developed with music and his ‘likeminded spirits’ in other creative fields. In a sentimental journey that begins with Miró’s poster for John Cage and Merce Cunningham’s legendary performance in Sitges in 1966, and travels all the way to the Nits de Música at the Fundació, Escoffet brings us closer to the artist’s legacy, ‘an attitude, a spirit of openness and an urge to engage in dialogue with the present.’

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20_12_2017

Malet is Leaving, but Rosa Maria Is Here to Stay. A Nuanced Farewell

Rosa Maria Malet is leaving. In September, the Board of Trustees of the Fundació Joan Miró appointed Marko Daniel as the new director. The farewell party that the Fundació held last July for the woman who had been at the helm of the institution during the past 37 years was not a farewell to a position, but to a person: to Rosa Maria, to her character, to her way of being and of doing things. Many media outlets and numerous journalists have featured her in their spaces and interviews over the past few months. Isidre Estévez, a journalist friend and a person with close, long-standing ties to the Fundació, had a chance to hold a very personal interview with her.

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The Fate of Mesopotamian Architecture in the Spiral of Image Reproduction

From Le Corbusier’s sketches for a monumental ziggurat-museum in Geneva (Mundaneum, 1929) to urban development plans for cities like New York in the 1920s, Mesopotamian forms have had a profound impact on modern visual and architectural culture in the West.

As part of the Sumer and the Modern Paradigm exhibition, the archaeologist and researcher Maria Gabriella Micale explores how twentieth-century architecture was influenced by the drawings of the pioneers of archaeology, reinterpreting and recasting the architecture of the ancient Near East in the design of modern buildings.

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23_10_2017

Gardens Don’t Exist; They’re An Illusion

Lately, an unusual garden has been growing at the Fundació Joan Miró – a garden designed by the artist Pep Vidal for bees and other insect pollinators, providing them with a pace of their own, without boundaries or conditions. Inspired by this project, Vicky Benítez, a Fine Arts graduate and professional gardener, offers us a nostalgic look at a lost, denatured world, dominated by the artifice of gardens that are organized according to primarily aesthetic criteria. Vicky Benítez proposes that we tend our gardens with a full awareness that we are not tending the body, but rather the soul; and she stresses the importance of urban vegetable gardens as spaces for social cohesion where nature (both human and non-human) can grow and develop freely.

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07_09_2017

The Perplexed Object

In the 1990s, the French critic and curator Nicolas Bourriaud laid the groundwork for the concept of relational art in his essay Esthétique relationnelle (Les presses du réelle, 1998). According to Bourriaud, the work of art is now presented ‘as a “duration” that must be experienced, as an invitation to unlimited dialogue.’

Following this approach, which emphasizes the viewer’s relationship to the art object, Jordi J. Clavero, the head of the Fundació Joan Miró’s Education Department, considers the concept of a work of art and its constant mutation as it is experienced first-hand by each one of its viewers.

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The Way We Are Made

On the occasion of the exhibition The Way Things Do, which celebrates the 30th anniversary of Fischli and Weiss’s iconic filmThe Way Things Go at the Fundació Joan Miró, Ivan Pintor looks at the way the Swiss duo’s film and the works by the young artists taking part in the exhibition connect with the comic strip and cinema tradition.

Ivan Pintor holds a PhD in Audiovisual Communication from Pompeu Fabra University and specialises in comparative cinema, audiovisual narrative and the history of the comic strip. In his article, Pintor investigates how chain reactions, constant motion and technological complexity have been addressed from Rube Goldberg’s cartoons and the weekly comic TBO to slapstick and science fiction films.

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