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25_07_2019

Praça Getulio Vargas

The architect Lina Bo Bardi, to whom the Fundació Joan Miró devoted an exhibition focused on her strong connection to drawing, conceived her projects as spaces that were accessible to everyone, brimming with nature and life. Her watercolours of urban scenes are also full of everyday life, like the piece illustrating the atmosphere at Praça Getúlio Vargas, in Río de Janeiro, in 1946. Amanda Bassa delves into this image and the ambient sounds surrounding the piece at exhibition to create a literary text that plays with the parallel worlds inside and outside the watercolour.

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29_05_2019

ORIM

Fifty years ago this May, the exhibition Miró, the Other was held at the Catalonia Architects’ Association (or COAC according to its Catalan acronym), the first exhibition of Joan Miró’s work to expound and demonstrate its militant facet.

In this blog, we reproduce an article by Cristian Cirici, published years ago in the “Traços” section of the e-magazine Carnet, which outlines the origins of the project.

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04_04_2019

Rock, Paper, Circus

Lina Bo Bardi Drawing is an exhibition about the architect’s deep sense of connection with drawing. For her, drawing was more than a designer’s tool; it was a primary expressive means driven by a strong sense of curiosity and doubt. In the following article, the architect and exhibition curator Olga Subirós shares some of her memories to offer us a closer look at Lina Bo Bardi’s work.

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29_11_2018

The Future was Female

Fascinated by both her character and her work, Leila Méndez, a self-taught photographer living in Barcelona, provides us with a multiple portrait of the different facets of Lee Miller. In just a few shots, Méndez captures the essence of the surrealist artist and of other photographers who, like Miller, experienced the vulnerability and the power that you feel in front of a camera, posing as a professional model.

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19_09_2018

Scars and Reparations

In this article, Dolors Bramon, a historian with a PhD in Semitic languages, takes a historical look at the conflict between different cultures in Spain inaccurately referred to as convivencia. The author questions the honesty of the meaning of multiculturalism and underscores the need for repairing historical injustices. As in Kader Attia’s work, for Dolors Bramon scars are cries against oblivion.

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11_05_2018

The Ballad of El Clot de la Mel (‘Honey Hollow’)

The auca is a literary genre of humble proportions, yet deeply rooted in Catalan popular culture. “We must find poetry that moves us, there in the most modest of things”, said Miró. On the occasion of the project Beehave, and coinciding with the intervention La Grieta by Alfonso Borragán, Jordi Sunyer and Oriol Canosa have proposed The Ballad of El Clot de la Mel (‘Honey Hollow’), an auca with an informal tone that defends the importance of urban apiculture.

Jordi Sunyer (illustration) and Oriol Canosa (text) are creators working in the field of children’s literature. Together they have published La casa del professor Kürbis (Baula), Apa, et penses que ens ho creurem? (Cruïlla) and EicTu XicMano, el pirata del Delta (Pebre Negre).

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20_12_2017

Malet is Leaving, but Rosa Maria Is Here to Stay. A Nuanced Farewell

Rosa Maria Malet is leaving. In September, the Board of Trustees of the Fundació Joan Miró appointed Marko Daniel as the new director. The farewell party that the Fundació held last July for the woman who had been at the helm of the institution during the past 37 years was not a farewell to a position, but to a person: to Rosa Maria, to her character, to her way of being and of doing things. Many media outlets and numerous journalists have featured her in their spaces and interviews over the past few months. Isidre Estévez, a journalist friend and a person with close, long-standing ties to the Fundació, had a chance to hold a very personal interview with her.

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The Fate of Mesopotamian Architecture in the Spiral of Image Reproduction

From Le Corbusier’s sketches for a monumental ziggurat-museum in Geneva (Mundaneum, 1929) to urban development plans for cities like New York in the 1920s, Mesopotamian forms have had a profound impact on modern visual and architectural culture in the West.

As part of the Sumer and the Modern Paradigm exhibition, the archaeologist and researcher Maria Gabriella Micale explores how twentieth-century architecture was influenced by the drawings of the pioneers of archaeology, reinterpreting and recasting the architecture of the ancient Near East in the design of modern buildings.

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23_10_2017

Gardens Don’t Exist; They’re An Illusion

Lately, an unusual garden has been growing at the Fundació Joan Miró – a garden designed by the artist Pep Vidal for bees and other insect pollinators, providing them with a pace of their own, without boundaries or conditions. Inspired by this project, Vicky Benítez, a Fine Arts graduate and professional gardener, offers us a nostalgic look at a lost, denatured world, dominated by the artifice of gardens that are organized according to primarily aesthetic criteria. Vicky Benítez proposes that we tend our gardens with a full awareness that we are not tending the body, but rather the soul; and she stresses the importance of urban vegetable gardens as spaces for social cohesion where nature (both human and non-human) can grow and develop freely.

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The Way We Are Made

On the occasion of the exhibition The Way Things Do, which celebrates the 30th anniversary of Fischli and Weiss’s iconic filmThe Way Things Go at the Fundació Joan Miró, Ivan Pintor looks at the way the Swiss duo’s film and the works by the young artists taking part in the exhibition connect with the comic strip and cinema tradition.

Ivan Pintor holds a PhD in Audiovisual Communication from Pompeu Fabra University and specialises in comparative cinema, audiovisual narrative and the history of the comic strip. In his article, Pintor investigates how chain reactions, constant motion and technological complexity have been addressed from Rube Goldberg’s cartoons and the weekly comic TBO to slapstick and science fiction films.

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15_06_2017

À toute épreuve and the Art of Language

On the occasion of the Éluard, Cramer, Miró – À toute épreuve, more than a book exhibition, Dolors R. Roig examines the creative process behind the book by Joan Miró based on a collection of poems by Paul Éluard, explaining how Miró ventured beyond illustration and how the collaborative project led to new poems. While reviewing this creative adventure, her article addresses the way in which Éluard’s and Miró’s imaginations merged.

Dolors R. Roig holds a PhD in Art History and specializes in modern and contemporary art. She is responsible for art research and programming at Galeria Mayoral and teaches at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, where she was involved in the Joan Miró: An Artist Who Defined a Century MOOC and the Miró Studies Postgraduate Diploma.

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19_04_2017

Meeting Joan Brossa

The foyer at the Fundació, devoted to amateur photography, is currently the venue for the Joaquim Gomis exhibition titled Brossa at La Ricarda and will soon feature From a Pixel a Poem, by Cloe Masotta, as part of Epicentre Brossa, an activities programme centred on the life and work of Joan Brossa, the poet and visual artist who transformed contemporary Catalan culture.

Cloe Masotta, a film critic and professor who handles film programming for museums and cultural centres, has completed a research project on Joan Brossa as part of the Independent Studies Programme at the MACBA Museum in Barcelona. Here she tells us about her immersion into Brossa’s world and describes the sequence of coincidences through which the poet worked his way into her life.

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02_03_2017

The Curse of Saying

The explanation is as follows: to consider a risk involves calculating. It’s true that this is probably determined by the verb to consider, but it is no less true that the noblest of things (in Montaigne’s terms) tend to deprecate risk. They don’t ‘consider’ it. Or not much. Risk in art is nothing in itself. At the most, it is a subsidiary element to other deeper things, by no means an ultimate goal. Does risk really mean anything at all in art? Isn’t risk simply a token of what we had previously been determined to do?

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22_12_2016

Art in Check: Passion and Obsession

‘I play chess day and night. I like painting less and less,’ stated Marcel Duchamp in 1923 after finishing one of his great works, Le Grand Verre (The Large Glass). It is impossible to separate the painter from the chess player, because Duchamp’s art was always in check, and he viewed this mental sport as a source of creativity.

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